The Unique Welding Profession: Still Vibrant

The welding profession is a beautiful one – if not trendy – and for many reasons. For one thing, the profession is as old as man and not obsolete! Over the millennia, it has continued to evolve and remain not just relevant, but essential to humanity. Moreover, if history tells us anything, it is that it will continue to be so. Let’s see why this is so and how individual welders can enjoy their profession better.

Welding and Automation

Automation seems to be threatening the future of trade generally as many expect robots to take over jobs. Are welders threatened too? What do the employment trends suggests?

According to report, the  welding market “remains one of the hottest tickets … to a good livelihood, readily attainable to anyone with the aptitude for it. This is true in manufacturing but also in the construction and energy labour markets too.”

An article notes that this growing demand for people instead automation is “the tightest since 2000, resulting in increased competition for skilled and experienced workers.”

A noted economist, quoted in the article said, “The energy rebound is putting additional demand on regional markets for skilled workers such as welders and equipment operators. We expect wages in the construction industry to continue to experience above-average gains as labour supply lags behind demand.”

It is safe to say Welders are save. Automation does not appear to pose any danger.

Multi-industry

Welders are in high demand for their flexibility, which makes it possible for them to ply their trader  across various of industries, including the major three – Construction, Energy and Manufacturing.

A welder is practically spoiled for choice. There is a wide range of trades that includes architectural welding, automotive welding , boat and ship building, industrial manufacturing, pipeline welding, and many more to pick from.

Specialties count

True, welders have options to choose from, yet speciality is vital. Although some welders pride themselves as master of all – having a broad knowledge of various skills, many are specialists in a particular technique. Through training in this particular technique, they have carved out a real area of expertise – and sometimes recognition – for themselves.

For a welder just starting out, or one considering upskilling, please know and consider the fact that there are specialities where the demand is greater. Two areas particularly, namely – MIG welding and TIG welding.

Welding is goes beyond attaching metals together. There are some companies where you just have to be a specialist. For instance, in companies that deals with making pipes liquid transport, it is more than just welding the pipes at where they meet. Some of these pipes carry corrosive liquid and so requires proper field joint coating to protect against the corrosive liquid. Only a specialist in these aspect can effectively carry out this process,

Job Locations

There are some regions in every country where there are greater need, and consequently concentration, of welders. These are usually regions that serve as the countries industrial centres – usually the locations for the Construction, Energy and Manufacturing companies. These regions are where the big welding jobs are and as long as these industries remain, the welding profession thrives and lives on.

Welder Career Path

Similar to other skilled trades the best route to take for aspiring welders is through technical schools, community colleges and the vital, tried and trusted, good, old-fashioned, on-the-job training.

Of course, there are other paths and these paths have their own advantages, however, trade and technical schools may offer the fastest route. There are some courses as brief as two-four weeks, and upon completion, students are eligible for certification.

Welding requires hard work, but it pays. If you have the passion for it, you will find out that the benefit and uniqueness are remarkable and enduring.

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